Compensation Claim for Nerve Damage Caused by the Dentist

Is it possible to pursue compensation claim for nerve damage caused by the dentist if it occurred two years ago?

It may still be possible to pursue a compensation claim for nerve damage caused by the dentist if it occurred two years ago; however it would be in your best interest to contact a claims solicitor at the first possible moment as it is unlikely you have much time left to make this claim. Because of the UK Statute of Limitations that was established in 1980 as part of the UK Limitations Act, the amount of time that people generally have in which to make a claim for compensation is three years. This law was introduced so that potential claimants would only be able to make a claim while there is still recent evidence of their dental medical negligence injury or illness and also so that a negligent party would not have to constantly fear potential litigation.

Because of this, your three year time limit to pursue a claim for when the dentist caused damage to nerves either began on the date that your nerve damage was sustained during a dental procedure, or the date that you first became aware of the nerve damage if the symptoms were not initially clear. There are exceptions to this time limit, however. If your damaged nerves sustained at the dentist occurred while you were still a minor you may have more time to make a claim as the Statute of Limitations applies somewhat differently to child injury claims. Because minors are not legally permitted by UK law to make a claim for themselves or to advise a solicitor on their own behalf, the three year time limit does not begin until they turn eighteen, meaning that you would have until you are twenty one to make a claim.

Arranging a consultation with a claims solicitor at the soonest possible moment to discuss your compensation claim for nerve damage caused by the dentist is of the utmost importance as there could be a number of unforeseen delays when it comes to the claims process. For instance, gathering evidence could be an issue in addition to calculating the amount of claim for when the dentist caused damage to nerves for compensation you could be entitled to.

The medical consequences of nerve damage sustained at the dentist can range from mild and short term repercussions to severe and permanent injury. It can occur when anaesthesia is administered to the inferior alveolar nerve in order to numb the jaw, tongue and teeth during dental procedures. Occasionally nerve damage can occur which may manifest in tingling and a feeling of sensitivity in the upper lip and chin. Another kind of nerve damage that can occur at the dentist is lingual nerve damage, which can result in numbness of the tongue, the loss of ability to taste and speak properly. Many patients can recover from these symptoms however; sometimes the damage can be permanent and excruciatingly painful.

It is important that you inform your solicitor of the nature and severity of your nerve damage so that they can they will be able to give you relevant, specific legal advice on the strength of your claim for damaged nerves sustained at the dentist and its likelihood of success. It is in your best interest to contact your solicitor at the first possible opportunity to discuss your compensation claim for nerve damage caused by the dentist.


Speak to a medical negligence solicitor about your claim